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[NEW YORK CITY, USA] BitDevs Meetup

November 7, 2015 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm


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Presentation: Peter Todd – The good, bad, and ugly of proof-of-work

BitDevs is a group tailored towards those interested in the discussion and development of the Bitcoin protocol, blockchain related technologies, decentralized and distributed consensus mechanisms, cryptography, information security and open source fintech. You can be well versed with or new to the topics, all are welcome.

Socratic Style Meetups:

Our socratic events are formatted to foster debate, information sharing and lively discussion. The first half of the event is dedicated to discussion topics that cover subjects such as: Bitcoin core development (e.g. bitcoin-development mailing list, pull requests, #bitcoin-dev, BIPs), weekly network statistics, building/modifying Bitcoin related software/hardware, scalability, smart contracts, attack vectors of the Bitcoin protocol, alternative uses for blockchains, and many other related topics in the Bitcoin/crypto ecosystem.  To complete the meeting, members present their open source projects, companies, research and other relevant materials. A feedback and Q&A section follow. A newsletter is sent out the day of the event which outlines discussion topics.

Please contact the organizers if you’d like to present at a future Socratic event or have a recommended topic for discussion: bitdevsnyc at gmail dot com.

Whitepaper Wednesdays

A bimonthly journal club to discuss specific topics in the Bitcoin ecosystem. This is an academic-style journal club where one person chooses a topic or paper and presents it. Participants are expected to have read the paper or other material suggested by the discussion leader. The discussion leader doesn’t have to be an expert on the subject, but should be interested enough in it to read the paper thoroughly so as to give a decent presentation. After informally presenting the topic, the group can then ask questions or open discussion surrounding the topic. The presentation should be informal (slides are allowed, but whiteboard/chalkboard is preferred), and this should be a discussion, not a one-way transmission of information by the presenter. The reading material doesn’t have to be a whitepaper.  In the case of widely-known topics (such as Elliptic Curve encryption) a chapter of a textbook, Wikipedia article, or other material can be suggested.

To propose a topic to present or volunteer to present a paper, please contact bmcelrath at sldx dot com.

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Union Square Ventures
915 Broadway, 19th Floor
New York City, NY 10010 United States
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