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[Stanford, USA] Blockchain Protocol Analysis and Security Engineering 2017

January 26, 2017 @ 8:00 am - January 27, 2017 @ 5:00 pm

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Blockchain Protocol Analysis and Security Engineering (BPASE) 2017 – Call for papers! This conference will explore the use of formal methods, empirical analysis, and risk modeling to better understand security and systemic risk in blockchain protocols.  The conference aims to foster multidisciplinary collaboration among practitioners and researchers in blockchain protocols, distributed systems, cryptography, computer security, and risk management. Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis with a final deadline of Nov. 30.

Call for Papers

The conference will explore the use of formal methods, empirical analysis, and risk modeling to better understand security and systemic risk in blockchain protocols.  The conference aims to foster multidisciplinary collaboration among practitioners and researchers in blockchain protocols, distributed systems, cryptography, computer security, and risk management. (Suggested topics of interest)

Submission instructions: Submissions can be full papers or presentation slides. Please make sure that the submission provides sufficient detail to explain what the talk will be about. Papers or presentations may be previously presented or published. Submissions should be technical in nature, but including considerations of the legal, policy, and ethical implications of results is appreciated. All submissions must be written in English, and be in PDF format, with no author names or affiliations in the submission document to facilitate blind review. Please email your submission to stanford-cyber@stanford.edu

Rolling Submission Deadline: Oct. 31 – Nov. 30, 2016

Final Author Notification: Dec. 1, 2016

Conference Dates: January 26-27, 2017

Venue:  Paul Brest Hall (555 Salvatierra Walk), Stanford University. Map

Program Committee:

  • Allison Berke (Stanford)
  • Dan Boneh (Stanford)
  • Joseph Bonneau (Stanford, EFF)
  • Byron Gibson (Entrepreneur, Startup Advisor)
  • Elaine Shi (Cornell, IC3)
  • Emin Gün Sirer (Cornell, IC3)
  • Peter Todd (Bitcoin Core)

BPASE 2017 Topics of Interest

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Security Engineering
  • Security engineering challenges in cryptosystems
  • Effective testing of blockchain protocols & implementations (simulation, experiment design, testnets, etc.)
  • Safely upgrading blockchain systems in production
  • Formal methods & symbolic execution applied to blockchain and cryptosystem analysis and design
  • Formal verification of cryptographic and consensus-critical code
  • Design and analysis tools for distributed systems and cryptosystems
  • Limitations of formal methods in cryptography and distributed systems
  • Aspects of cryptosystem design: intent/assumptions, model/specification, and implementation.  Formal methods can improve modeling and implementation, but what tools can help reason about intent and assumptions?
  • Programming language design & logic for blockchain protocols & smart contracts
  • Business & Economic Risk Analysis
  • The nature of systemic risk in a blockchain-based world
  • The implications of protocol-level engineering decisions on security, economics, and business risk in production
  • Comparative utility/risk analysis:  blockchain systems vs the systems they aim to replace
  • Sensitive dependence on initial conditions over long durations (small protocol changes now could have large effects in the future, are there tools or methods that can help study this progression of effects)
  • Other examinations of the relationship between blockchain protocol computer science, and economic and policy analysis
  • Post-mortems
  • Formal methods & empirical analysis in practice
  • Project postmortems (of blockchains if any exist, or a few illustrative non-blockchain examples)
  • Blockchain education
  • Defense in depth
  • Developing the adversarial mindset among blockchain developers
  • Raising the standard of security engineering in blockchain systems
  • Lessons from other mission/safety/life-critical areas of engineering (banking, aerospace, energy, defense, etc)
  • Intersectional Security
  • Security & risk implications of interactions with other technologies, for example IoT or AI.

Details

Start:
January 26, 2017 @ 8:00 am
End:
January 27, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
Event Category:
Event Tags:
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Website:
https://cyber.stanford.edu/blockchainconf

Organizer

Stanford Cyber Initiative
Email:
stanford-cyber@stanford.edu
Website:
https://cyber.stanford.edu/about/about-stanford-cyber-initiative

Venue

Paul Brest Hall
555 Salvatierra Walk
Stanford , CA 94305 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
(650) 723-3126
Website:
https://rde.stanford.edu/hospitality/