Bank Of England Releases Major Paper on Blockchain and Central Banking

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The Bank of England has just released a significant Blockchain paper –  Macroeconomics of central bank issued digital currencies, by John Barrdear and Michael Kumhof, which discusses the consequences of a central bank making a digital form of cash available to the general public.

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We study the macroeconomic consequences of issuing central bank digital currency (CBDC) — a universally accessible and interest-bearing central bank liability, implemented via distributed ledgers, that competes with bank deposits as medium of exchange. In a DSGE model calibrated to match the pre-crisis United States, we find that CBDC issuance of 30% of GDP, against government bonds, could permanently raise GDP by as much as 3%, due to reductions in real interest rates, distortionary taxes, and monetary transaction costs. Countercyclical CBDC price or quantity rules, as a second monetary policy instrument, could substantially improve the central bank’s ability to stabilise the business cycle.

In other words, they are talking about a complex economic model in which anyone can hold money at a central bank, fully risk-free, as an alternative to bank deposits (money created by banks).

From Positivemoney.org:

  • The paper essentially models a partial Sovereign Money System in which anyone can hold their money in the form of risk-free digital cash created by central bank. This gives the public an alternative to bank deposits. However, banks would still be able to create money.
  • In the model, digital cash is created only when the central bank purchases bonds from households or investors. The paper does not consider what would happen if the central bank created digital cash to finance government services or tax cuts, although it notes these questions for future research.
  • The model suggests that the introduction of digital cash would have some key benefits:
    • It could boost GDP by around 3%, due to “reductions in real interest rates, in distortionary tax rates, and in monetary transaction costs…’.
    • It can give the central bank a second monetary policy tool to stabilise the economy.
    • It could improve financial stability.
  • The paper flags up the fact that the transition could be risky and needs to be well managed.
  • In the section on Pros and Cons of CBDC, the paper confirms many of the advantages that we also covered in our paper Digital Cash: Why central banks should issue an electronic money.

About Richard Kastelein

Founder and publisher of industry publication Blockchain News (EST 2015), partner at ICO services collective CryptoAsset Design Group ($500m+ and 50+ ICOs), director of education company Blockchain Partners (Oracle Partner) – Vancouver native Richard Kastelein is an award-winning publisher, innovation executive and entrepreneur.

He sits on the advisory boards of some two dozen Blockchain startups
and has written over 1500 articles on Blockchain technology and
startups at Blockchain News and has also published pioneering articles on ICOs in Harvard Business Review and Venturebeat

Ad honorem - Honorary Ph.d - Chair Professor of Blockchain at
China's first Blockchain University in Nanchang at the Jiangxi Ahead
Institute of Software and Technology. In 2018 he was invited to and attended University of Oxford's Saïd Business School for Business
Automation 4.0 programme. Chevalier (Knight) - Ordre des Arts et des
Technologies at Crypto Chain University and on advisory board of Advisory Board Member of International Decentralized Association Of Cryptocurrency And Blockchain (IDABC) as well as Advisory Board Member at U.S. Blockchain Association.

Over a half a decade experience judging and rewarding some 1000+
innovation projects as an EU expert for the European Commission's SME
Instrument programme as a startup assessor and as a startup judge for
the UK government's Innovate UK division. Kastelein has spoken
(keynotes & panels) on Blockchain technology in Amsterdam, Antwerp, Barcelona, Beijing, Brussels, Bucharest, Dubai, Eindhoven, Gdansk, Groningen, the Hague, Helsinki, London (5x), Manchester, Minsk, Nairobi, Nanchang, San Mateo, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Shanghai, Singapore (3x), Tel Aviv, Utrecht, Venice, Visakhapatnam, Zwolle and Zurich

His network is global and extensive. He is a Canadian (Dutch/Irish/English/Métis) whose writing career has ranged from the Canadian Native Press (Arctic) to the Caribbean & Europe

He's written occasionally for Harvard Business Review, Wired, Venturebeat, The Guardian and Virgin.com and his work and ideas have been translated into Dutch, Greek, Polish, German and French.

A journalist by trade, an entrepreneur and adventurer at heart,
Kastelein's professional career has ranged from political publishing to
TV technology, boatbuilding to judging startups, skippering yachts to
marketing and more as he's travelled for nearly 30 years as a Canadian
expatriate living around the world

In his 20s, he sailed around the world on small yachts and wrote a
series of travel articles called, 'The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Seas'
travelling by hitching rides on yachts (1989) in major travel and
yachting publications. 

He currently lives in Groningen, Netherlands where he's raising three teenage daughters with his wife and sailing partner, Wieke Beenen.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. I am just getting started with the crypto currencies in terms of researching its potential for use as a digital currency in the U.S. and the rest of the world. I hope to learn and share what I can with my family and friends. I am sure there are plenty of pros and cons for and against this currency.

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